Tagged with profiling

Fire Bugs Part 5 – More Motives

In my last post, I listed seven basic motives for arson. They were fraud, pyromania, crime concealment, vanity, spite or revenge, civil disorder, political or revolutionary activity, and the mischief of juveniles. I gave a brief description of the first two. Today I’ll finish off those seven motives. My information comes from the book The Anatomy … Continue reading

Fire Bugs Part 4 – Motive

I’m doing a series from the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. The topic today is the motive of arsonists. (This photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net) In a previous post, I gave the definition of a nuisance arsonist: one who sets fires in trash cans, garbage heaps, and empty buildings. They aren’t looking … Continue reading

Fire Bugs Part 3 – More Profile

A couple posts back, I began a series from the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker to help authors create better antagonists. The bad guy I’ve been working on is the arsonist. So far I’ve outlined that an arsonist is a coward, preferring to exact his revenge for slights from a distance. … Continue reading

Signature vs. Modus Operandi

I’m using the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker to create believable antagonists. I’m in the middle of a discussion about arsonists, but the authors take a quick break from that to discuss the difference between signature and modus operandi. Then I’ll get back to arsonists. (This signature courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net) A … Continue reading

Fire Bugs Part 2 – The Profile

I’m using the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker to create believable antagonists. My last post began a discussion on fire-starters and why it’s important to understand how these violent offenders think and act, even if your bad guy isn’t an arsonist. Check the previous post if you’re lost.  (Photo courtesy of … Continue reading

Fire Bugs

The book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshake contains excellent information for writers who need to create believable antagonists. Chapter Two is all about bad guys who play with fire and what makes them tick. Even if your story doesn’t contain a fire-starter, almost all violent offenders played with matches when they were … Continue reading

The Role of Fantasy

I’m back with another exciting installment of a series based on The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. I’m using the information to create believable antagonists. Today’s post may also curl your toes or turn your stomach, so hang onto something. Douglas says, “After interviewing a large number of serial predatory criminals, we … Continue reading

Superiority & Inadequacy

Welcome back to my series based on the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. Douglas was a profiler for the FBI and used his vast experience with violent offenders to create profiles for use in law enforcement. I’m using the information from the book to create believable antagonists. Today I want … Continue reading

Homicidal Triad

Welcome to the second post of this series based on the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. Today’s topic is the Homicidal Triad, or the three youthful behaviors that generally mark the background of a violent offender. I’m going to preface this post with a bit of personal commentary. There’s a … Continue reading

Behavior Reflects Personality

I’m reading an awesome book called The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. The tag line on the front says, “The FBI’s legendary Mindhunter explores the key to understanding and catching violent criminals.” This book belongs to my husband (he’s a professional crime analyst and studies criminology in his spare time), so I … Continue reading