Tagged with profiling

Creating Assassins

I’m back in the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker about profiling in an effort to create believable antagonists. Today that antagonist is an assassin–not the kind who kill for money, but they kind who grab a gun and go on a killing spree. The chapter begins with the story of Charles … Continue reading

Creating a Victim

I’m studying the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker about profiling in an effort to create believable antagonists. Today’s chapter led me in a slightly different direction. I found a brief section in chapter six about victims that I’d like to share.  (The “Cross Country Killer” Glen Rogers) Most of this chapter … Continue reading

When People Snap

In my on-going study to create more believable antagonists, I’m studying the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. The chapter I’m in now deals with people in the workplace who, for no apparent reason, snap and kill their co-workers, bosses, even themselves. It also applies to students who enter their school campus … Continue reading

Poison is for Ladies?

Creating believable antagonists is vital for fiction writers. I have an advantage over some writers in that my husband is a crime analyst and criminologist, so I can go to him and ask him to profile my bad guys when I’m first creating them. He comes up with awesome stuff! For those of you who … Continue reading

Rule-breaking Rebel Writers

In an attempt to create more believable antagonists for my works, I’m studying the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. Douglas is an FBI profiler, so he knows his stuff. I’m in chapter four, dealing with product tampering and poisoners. I found a couple of paragraphs that helped me, so I’ll pass … Continue reading

What Kind of Guy Tampers with Tylenol?

Chapter four of The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker is called Name Your Poison. It covers cases that may look like product tampering but involve different types of offenders with different motives. Why am I cover this, you ask? To help create more believable antagonists. If your bad guy isn’t believable, it … Continue reading

How Criminals Use the Media for Gain

I’m back to the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker and deep in the chapter on how media fits in with violent offenders. I’ll admit, when I got to the section I’m covering today, I couldn’t figure out how to use it in my writing to create a believable antagonist. Then it … Continue reading

Media, Fantasy, and the Violent Offender

In an effort to create more believable antagonists, I’m studying the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. Douglas is an FBI profiler and has written several books on the subject. In my last post, I began a series on violent offenders who use force and are “influenced” by media. Most violent offenders … Continue reading

TV made him do that?

The book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker has fantastic information about why violent offenders do what they do. The book is broken down into sections by crime type. I already covered arsonists. Today begins the series on violent offenders who blame the media for their actions. I’m using this information to create … Continue reading

Organized and Disorganized Arsonists

This is the sixth (and final) post on arsonists, based on information from the book The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker. I’m using the information to create more believable antagonists in my writing. I’ve covered the profile and motives of arsonists. Today’s topic is organized and disorganized arsonists, and how their motives and … Continue reading